What is The Swine Influenza Vaccine and Can it Really Prevent The Spread of Swine Influenza

Posted by admin on August 13, 2009 under Swine Flu Vaccine Information | Comments are off for this article

In 2009, the global community was struck by one of the worst epidemics in history.  A disease so viral its spread is virtually impossible to contain and manage.  The Swine Influenza epidemic of 2009 has now achieved a pandemic status.  The first time something like this has happened in the last four decades.

The WHO and many disease control organizations across the globe are scurrying to protect us from this new viral disease.  They are doing this by promoting preventative measures as well as unprecedented cooperation in developing a vaccine. However we must first educate ourselves of what a swine influenza vaccine really is and if there are any serious dangers from the swine influenza vaccine itself.

The development of a swine influenza vaccine is a long and tedious process which can only be undertaken by only a handful of pharmaceutical companies.  The vaccine development process is quite intricate; they utilize various bits of several different flu viruses to construct a vaccine which specifically stimulates the body’s own immune system against the Swine Influenza Virus.  The reason for using bits of the virus is because it would be the only way to generate sufficient quantities of the vaccine (the bits of viruses are actually grown in hen eggs).  After the viruses are extracted from the hen eggs, they are broken down into smaller pieces which ensure the protein coat of the virus is exposed so that it can induce an auto-immune response in humans.

Antibodies are then formed in the blood as a direct response to the external protein particles.  These are the particles that best resemble those of the swine flu virus.  Therefore the vaccine actually loads the immune system full of antibodies which will attack the swine flu virus should a person contract it.

The problem with the swine influenza vaccine is that manufactures such as Glaxo Smithkline who makes both the Tamiflu (oseltamivir) and Relenza (zanamivir) swine influenza vaccines is the sheer quantities that are required in order to meet demand.  In order to produce enough vaccines chemical agents called adjuvants will have to be added to the vaccine mix.  Adjuvants are used to stimulate the immune system in order to make more antibodies because of reduced amounts of the actual vaccine (think of it as a booster shot for the vaccine).  The body will only make as much antibodies as it needs to fight off the infection which will require many people to get a second dose of the swine influenza vaccine, further stretching supplies.

Another problem is that the swine influenza virus is building a growing resistance to Relenza and Tamiflu vaccines.  We can only hope that the pandemic will pass and go with as little complications as possible.  However it may return in later years as a more potent mutated virulent form.  Lets pray that we have a powerful enough vaccine in sufficient enough quantities should that unfortunate event occur.  In the meantime make sure you follow standard preventative measures.

Analysis – Plant-based vaccines challenge big pharma for $3 billion flu market – Yahoo News UK

Posted by swine flu vaccine - Google News on October 1, 2014 under Swine Flu Vaccine Information | Be the First to Comment


Yahoo News UK
Analysis – Plant-based vaccines challenge big pharma for $3 billion flu market
Yahoo News UK
But if the strain that appears during flu season was not the one experts forecast, the vaccines might not work. The appearance of H1N1 swine flu in 2009-2010 took experts by surprise, and the flu was already on its second wave before a vaccine was

and more »

Plant-based vaccines challenge big pharma for $3 billion flu market – Yahoo News

Posted by swine flu vaccine - Google News on under Swine Flu Vaccine Information | Be the First to Comment

Plant-based vaccines challenge big pharma for $3 billion flu market
Yahoo News
But if the strain that appears during flu season was not the one experts forecast, the vaccines might not work. The appearance of H1N1 swine flu in 2009-2010 took experts by surprise, and the flu was already on its second wave before a vaccine was

and more »

Plant-based vaccines challenge big pharma for $3 billion flu market – KFGO

Posted by swine flu vaccine - Google News on under Swine Flu Vaccine Information | Be the First to Comment

Plant-based vaccines challenge big pharma for $3 billion flu market
KFGO
But if the strain that appears during flu season was not the one experts forecast, the vaccines might not work. The appearance of H1N1 swine flu in 2009-2010 took experts by surprise, and the flu was already on its second wave before a vaccine was

and more »

RPT – ANALYSIS-Plant-based vaccines challenge big pharma for $3 billion flu … – Thomson Reuters Foundation

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RPT – ANALYSIS-Plant-based vaccines challenge big pharma for $3 billion flu
Thomson Reuters Foundation
But if the strain that appears during flu season was not the one experts forecast, the vaccines might not work. The appearance of H1N1 swine flu in 2009-2010 took experts by surprise, and the flu was already on its second wave before a vaccine was

and more »

Flu vaccines underway in schools, with eye toward student achievement – Insurance News Net

Posted by swine flu vaccine - Google News on September 30, 2014 under Swine Flu Vaccine Information | Be the First to Comment


Charlotte Observer
Flu vaccines underway in schools, with eye toward student achievement
Insurance News Net
The efforts to fight flu through school systems began in earnest in 2009, when the H1N1 virus — the swine flu — was sweeping the country. That round of vaccines was shot-based, but in the years following H1N1, students have been able to take the
Flu vaccine a must, hospital tells workersCharlotte Observer
When Is The Best Time To Get A Flu Shot?Huffington Post Canada

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